What leads to dating teen violence

16-Dec-2016 22:08

The NSFG does not ask detailed questions about sex education.

Instead, researcher categorized respondents by their answer to two basic questions.

By this narrow definition they found that 66.8% of respondents reported receiving comprehensive sex education, 23.8% reported abstinence-only, and 9.4% reported no sex education.

However, no information was available about the quality, context, or duration of either the abstinence-only or comprehensive sex education programs.

To view this lesson click here: Source: Advocates for Youth Target Audience: Level IV (adolescence, ages 15 through 18, high school) Topic: Romantic Relationships and Dating Duration of Lesson: 40 to 50 minutes Date Published: Undated Summary: This lesson examines how gender roles affect relationships and explores situations where gender roles and stereotypes might affect teen’s goals, decisions and relationships.

H.) curriculum, Public Health – Seattle & King County Target Audience: Level IV (adolescence, ages 14 through 18; high school; grades 9-12) Duration of Lesson: Unspecified Date Published: 2011 Summary: This lesson focuses on how to have healthy and happy relationships, how someone might recognize if they are in an unhealthy relationship, and what kinds of communication skills can help youth have the relationships they want.

The researchers analyzed data from 1,719 heterosexual respondents to the NSFG who were 15–19. The authors focused on young people’s answers to two questions: whether they had received “any formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place about how to say no to sex” before the age of 18 and whether they had received any formal education about birth control.

This study used data collected in 2002–03 through the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), a nationwide survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics.

For example, it found that a plurality, 36.9%, of young people who received no sex education live in households that made less than ,000.

Moreover, the authors note that “generally individuals receiving no sex education tended to be from low-income, nonintact families, black, and from rural areas.” We know that young people of color and young people from low-income communities are disproportionately affected by teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.

These two groups were also compared to young people who reported receiving no formal sex education.

To assess sexual risk researchers looked at whether respondents reported ever having engaged in vaginal intercourse, been involved in a pregnancy, or been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD).

This study used data collected in 2002–03 through the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), a nationwide survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics.

For example, it found that a plurality, 36.9%, of young people who received no sex education live in households that made less than ,000.

Moreover, the authors note that “generally individuals receiving no sex education tended to be from low-income, nonintact families, black, and from rural areas.” We know that young people of color and young people from low-income communities are disproportionately affected by teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.

These two groups were also compared to young people who reported receiving no formal sex education.

To assess sexual risk researchers looked at whether respondents reported ever having engaged in vaginal intercourse, been involved in a pregnancy, or been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD).

SIECUS defines comprehensive sexuality education as programs that start in kindergarten and continue through 12th grade.