Dating site for aids patient

06-Jan-2017 04:47

“I didn’t find it bad,” Stefan says about his first time viewing an embalming.

“You want to make the person look good, and the family wants to see the person look good, because chances are, the last time they saw them, the person didn’t look good.” Stefan got his embalming license in 1966, but the funeral business wasn’t his first career.

“When kids get to be a certain age, you have to say to yourself, ‘You know what, I have to draw a line somewhere.’ You got to be around.” Eventually, he joined the Boston funeral home that buried his paternal grandfather, Graham Putnam & Mahoney Funeral Parlor, which also had a few other locations across Massachusetts.

Stefan saved the money he made playing music and purchased two of its parlors in 1975; he sold one location, but decided to run the Worcester one himself.

Eventually, though, his reputation as the man who would bury anyone made him busy enough that he could afford to quit jumping in at nightclubs and focus on his family life and the parlor.

It also made him the likely candidate to take on the most difficult burials: people with no family and those tainted by crime or controversy.

Funerals are big business, with the average funeral costing more than ,000, according to the Funeral Consumers Alliance.

dating site for aids patient-40

“The families know they’re there, and they want nothing to do with it.” Still, Stefan is sparing those dead from the even sadder fate of a mass grave, where thousands of the poor and forgotten are buried each year in New York City and Los Angeles alone.Plenty of them listened to the baseless rumors about how the disease was transmitted; some even made families pay for new equipment after caring for their deceased relatives.Stefan stepped up and took on the challenge, traveling from the Berkshires to Cape Cod to pick up and bury the virus’s victims.The first time I sat in Stefan’s office nearly two years ago, he was working on a funeral for a couple who had lost a newborn child and owed 0 for the cemetery costs, which insurance wouldn’t cover.Stefan knew they couldn’t afford it and ended up taking 0 from the insurance check to pay them back. To make up for the lack of revenue per ceremony, Stefan has to host a funeral nearly every day, and the wear and tear from the constant passage of mourners through his halls is evident.

“The families know they’re there, and they want nothing to do with it.” Still, Stefan is sparing those dead from the even sadder fate of a mass grave, where thousands of the poor and forgotten are buried each year in New York City and Los Angeles alone.Plenty of them listened to the baseless rumors about how the disease was transmitted; some even made families pay for new equipment after caring for their deceased relatives.Stefan stepped up and took on the challenge, traveling from the Berkshires to Cape Cod to pick up and bury the virus’s victims.The first time I sat in Stefan’s office nearly two years ago, he was working on a funeral for a couple who had lost a newborn child and owed 0 for the cemetery costs, which insurance wouldn’t cover.Stefan knew they couldn’t afford it and ended up taking 0 from the insurance check to pay them back. To make up for the lack of revenue per ceremony, Stefan has to host a funeral nearly every day, and the wear and tear from the constant passage of mourners through his halls is evident.“You weren’t going to contract anything if you are careful, let’s face it,” Stefan says.